Tag: rugs

What would you like to know about antique rugs?

We at Rahmanan are working to give you the best possible experience in shopping for your antique rug. We understand that many people have questions or concerns when buying an antique for their floor, and have a yearning to know more about the processes and people who were involved in the craft of these pieces. We would love to answer any questions you may have, as well as educate our customers more about the wonderful world of antique rugs. We would like to provide the ultimate purchasing experience for our clients, so if there are any topics you would be interested in knowing more about, please let us know.

To know more about us you can enter in this link:

http://rahmanan.com/

 

 

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Rug Classifications

The first thing that most people want to understand about rugs is how to classify them. There are a number of ways to do this.

  • One could classify rugs by general rug type:
    a. Tribal Weavings
    b. Cottage Rugs
    c. Workshop Rugs
  • One could classify rugs by the style they portray:
    a. Tribal, or geometric, weavings.
    b. Decorative, or casual, rugs.
    c. City, or formal, rugs.
  • From there, a more specific classification comes into play, where the rug is from:
    Persia
    Turkey
    India
    The Caucuses
    Europe
    China
    Turkoman
    America
    Israel
    Morocco
    Palestine
  • After pinpointing where a rug is from, it can further be categorized by weave type and color to a distinct area within the countries of origin. Here is a list of most types of rugs:
  • Persian Rugs:

Afshar
Bakhtiari
Bakhshaiesh
Bibikabad
Bidjar
Farahan
Gabbeh
Ghashgaie
Hamadan
Heriz
Isfahan
Joshaqan
Karaja
Kashan
Kashan – Dabir
Kashan – Mohtasham
Kazvin
Kerman
Kerman – Lavar
Kurdish
Lilihan
Mahal
Malayer
Malayer – Mishan
Mashad
Mashad – Sabeer
Mood (NE Persian)
NW Persian
Qum
Sarouk
Sarouk – Farahan
Sarouk – Mohajeran
Senneh
Serab
Seraband
Serapi
Shiraz
Sultanabad
Sultanabad – Ziegler
Tabriz
Tabriz – Haji Jalili
Tehran

  • Turkish Rugs:
    Ghiordes
    Melas
    Oushak
    Oushak – Angora
    Oushak – Borlou
    Sivas
    Yuruk
  • Indian Rugs:
    Agra
    Amritsar
    Dhurrie
    Sharistan

 

  • Caucasian:
    Bidjov
    Chi-Chi
    Kuba
    Karabagh
    Lesghi
    Moghan
    Shirvan
    Talish
    Zeychor
    Kazak
  • European:
    Arraiolos Needlework
    Aubusson
    Axminster
    Besserabian
    Donegal
    English Art Deco
    German – Bauhaus
    Needlepoint
    Rya
    Savonnerie
    Spanish – Cuenca
    Tapestry
    Ukranian
  • American:
    American Hooked Rugs
    Braided Rug
    Navajo
    Rag Rug
  • Chinese:
    Art Deco
    Khotan
    Mongolian
    Ning Xia
    Peking
    Samarghand
  • Turkoman:
    Baluch
    Ersari
    Beshir
    Hatchli
  • Other:
    Bezalel – Palestine
    Israeli
    Kerghiz
    Moroccan
  • All of the above:
    Soumak
    Kilim

To view  classify rugs on our website, please use this link:

http://www.antiquerugstudio.com/

 

#20231 Indian Agra: circa 1850

#20231
Agra Carpet
Northern India
8’0” x 10’0”
Circa 1850

Structure:

Warp: cotton, white, natural, Z-6 to 8-S
Weft:    cotton, white, natural, Z-3-S, Z-4-S, Z-5-S
2 shoots of weft alternating either 1 straight and 1 wavy, or both shoots straight.
Knots: wool, Z-2
Either Persia (asymmetrical) knots open left, horizontal.  15 x vertical 13 = 195/in².
Or
Persian (asymmetrical) jufti knots, open left, horizontal.  7.5 x vertical 13 = 98/in².
Alternate warps depressed 80-90°
Finishes: not original

Design:

This carpet is an excellent mid 19th century interpretation of a classical c.1600 Indo-Isfahan in the iconic in-and-out palmette and cloudband pattern, on a claret red lac ground.  The pattern is not centered and the actual vertical axis of the design is displaced approximately 9” to the right.  In a larger carpet it would be exactly centered, but it should be noted that even period rugs in this pattern may have design offsets.  The ability to shift the pattern indicates the use of a cartoon or a talim (a coded pattern book “read” out loud by a “talim reader”).

The border also follows the classical manner closely with an in-and-out palmette and thin vine design on a nicely abrashed sapphire blue ground.  The inner directional arrow head border also is consistent with the classical model.

The detail colors of blue-green, orange-ochre, tan, dark brown and buff are also traditional.

It is still an open question as to whether the classical prototypes are Persian (Isfahan) or Indian (Agra), but only Agra carpets of the 19th century carry on the design tradition virtually unchanged, although the long and narrow 17th century format has been replaced by more Western proportions.  Many Agra carpets, often of exceptional size, were woven by inmates of the local jail, but this is more likely to be a regular creation of fine quality by a local merchant.

The Jufti knots occur in areas of plain color and in irregular patches overall.  They may be seen both on the front and back of the rug.  The use of Jufti knots, allowing for quicker execution, seems to have appeared in Agra around 1800 and is an import from Khorossan in NE Persia where it is the standard knotting technique.  Although the weaving quality of jufti-knotted carpets in often severely compromised if their overall wool quality is low, their carpet is piled in excellent quality wool and the knots are closely packed.  As a result, it has aged well and is still in fine condition.  It is a decorative carpet with no elements of later design trends or tastes.

To view this rug on our website, please use this link:

http://www.antiquerugstudio.com/Agra/20231

 

Rugs of the Week

Art Deco American Hooked Rugs

We just love Art Deco rugs. Chinese, of course. European, when we can get them.  But when in considering  American Hooked rugs, can  we get beyond Currier and Ives rustic scenes, favorite pets and elementary pattern  repeats such as the “Log Cabin” design? Yes, but it takes some looking.  In our extensive collection of antique American Hooked rugs, a few from the 1920’s truly partake in the Deco aesthetic.  The narrow red runner with striking elongated medallion and matching corners (6462, 2.6 by 11.7) definitely qualifies. All geometric, with nothing floral or pictorial about it, it certainly looks Jazz Age. Abstraction and potential enlargement without artistic loss are among Deco hallmarks. This runner could be a scatter, a room size, a gallery carpet and still be incredibly striking. We would love to find one in any of these formats. Since hooked rugs are generally one-of-a-kind, even those from professional weavers, the chances are slim to none, but we still can dream!

6462
American Hooked Rug #6462, size 11’7″ x 2’6″

The two scatters (20304) and (20521) are similarly abstract, employing radiating triangles or stepped lightning flashes both with color schemes in the cool blue direction. The design of 20304 closely resembles that of certain Chinese Deco carpets. Was there any connection or just parallel inspiration? Although these rugs are quite small, they can be enlarged to full room size and still retain powerful visual impact. This is one of the criteria for Deco designs: they van be enlarged or reduced without losing graphic integrity. Just try this with, say, 18th century Rococo or Victorian Gothic.

20304
American Hooked Rug #20304, size 5’3 x 3’8″
20521
American Hooked Rug #20521, size 4’5″ x 2’2″

Speaking of potential enlargements, our 20517 with its black field, bold light blue Greek Key border and poly chrome flower centerpiece, looks like it came right out of a spacious salon on a grand 1930’s ocean liner, but it is, in fact, in scatter size. But it would look great massively expanded.This is a fine example of inspired American Hooked rug design.

20517
American Hooked Rug #20517, size 4’3″ x 2’7″

What is more Art Deco than Radio City Music Hall? Our 20529 (c. 1930) is a straightaway takeoff on the machine loom carpeting in the vast spaces there. Even the color scheme is related. One can, again, easily imagine this rug as a room size. Of course, Chinese or European Art Deco carpets are room size, and our examples are much smaller, but they have the same period style. They are an underappreciated strand in the vast universe of antique American Hooked rugs.

20529.jpg
American Hooked Rug #20529, size 5’6″ x 2’8″

 

 

Rugs of the Week (Akstafa,Shirvan)

Two Very Interesting Caucasian Long Rugs.

19752E.jpg

21711E

Our Caucasian Blog only briefly sketched the range of types from this mountainous region of a thousand languages and ethnicity. Here are a couple a particularly interesting pieces that help to expand on our remarks.

Good things do not last at Rahmanan! Somebody else may be interested in these rugs, but you still have a chance. Anyway, you can still see why attention should be paid. Consider the Akstafa. Our Caucasian Rug blog of last week did not mention Akstafa as a distinct type. Indeed, nobody did until the 1980’s.Located and regular between  Gendje and  Shirvan,  this highly individual weaving district seems to have almost exclusively specialized in just two rug types: a long rug, as here, with pairs of peacocks around eight-point medallions, on navy or brown-black fields, with a close scatter of smaller geometric devices. The more variety in these elements, the better the rug. Since our example has a particularly dense fill, it must be, and is very good. A true work of folk art. The other Akstafa design appears on prayer design rugs of smaller format and is usually an allover boteh (paisley) pattern. Both types employ the same ivory border with hooked squares. Akstafa seems not to have woven scatter rugs. Do not cut these artistically intriguing long rugs to make scatters!.

Rug no. 21711 (3.8 by 11.0) is a particularly fine example from a rare group of mid-19th century Shirvan long rugs, almost always with radiant blue, more or less open, grounds. A few simple geometric devices scarcely interrupt the open window character of the long royal blue ground. One can virtually step through it, into…….This rug is the aesthetic antithesis of the Akstafa, saying a lot with very little. Minimalist modern art has nothing  on this piece.Neither rug is more valid, more beautiful than the other. This Shirvan long  rug, one of a select group of no more than a few dozen known examples, employs, as almost all the others do, a poly chrome border of triangles, the so-called ‘Dragon’ pattern, which to our eyes looks more like a parade of wedgie shoes! So call it the colorful wedgie shoe border. Several examples of this select group are dated before 1850, and no. 19711 may be significantly older than our ultra-conservative attribution. The weave is neat, even  and regular

Are these rugs collectible? If you want to hang them vertically,then better have a mansion or country estate with tall ceilings, or you can roll them out for carpet aficionados to drool over. Or you can just treat them right and live with them and love them. What’s not to like?

Details of rugs.

IMG_5912

19752D2

21711-D6

21711-D5